An eloquent post on the joys of nature and climbing trees, containing an alarming statistic  – 32% of British children have never climbed a tree! When I was a child a thousand years ago, it would have been a bad day at the office to come in from play and not fallen out of at least one tree, scraped a knee, banged an elbow and, exhilarated, did it all again the next day. But what about the risks? Read Kriss’ articulate view on the subject. Ed

Whenever we go for a walk my children instantly start searching for trees to climb. And I always let them climb trees.

Number one in the National Trust’s list of “50 things to do before you’re 11 ¾” is climb a tree.

In parks and woods where there are trees whose lower arms spread out in a welcoming embrace, I notice how children are drawn to them.

The UK Forestry Commission is aware of this too. They try to keep rather than cut lower limbs in forest areas where people play: “We all remember those special trees with large lower limbs that we climbed, swung and bounced on.”

Yet too many children have never had this outdoor experience.  A 2011 study found that 32% of British children have never climbed a tree.

Many parks and councils ban tree climbing. The regulations of the nine Royal Parks – including Richmond Park and Hyde Park in London – state that it is an offence to climb or interfere with a tree.

Read the full post | Wild About Here

 

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Kriss MacDonald

I’m a mother, photographer, blogger, journalist, cook and dreamer. I’m British and American thus both Mum and Mom to my fraternal twins. I’m married to a geek genius. Once I was a city dweller and worked as an international journalist and news editor for AP and NBC News. Now I listen to owls screech and hoot at night and watch animals in the fields and woods surrounding our rural home. Wild About Here is a blog about nature adventures and living creatively with camera, kids, recipes & books.